Differentiating Seizures: A Chart

Differentiating Seizures: A Chart

A link to a downloadable chart that helps parents and doctors to differentiate SCN1A related seisures, Epilepsy, and Epilepsy Syndromes from Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies with Similar Clinical Features.

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Seizure Alert Dogs

Seizure Alert Dogs

As many studies have concluded, alert and assist dogs can be beneficial for people with epilepsy. Alert and assist dogs range from assisting a person in day to day life, alerting when a person has a seizure, to even prediction an upcoming seizure. Although it must be noted a dog cannot be trained to predict seizures, it does occur, and through training dogs can be used to alert upon seizures, and even call for emergency services.  And with the American Disability Act, these dogs are allowed in public places, stores, and other venues where...

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Seizures

Seizures

What are they and what to do Many people have an isolated seizure at some time in their lives. This can happen to anyone if the circumstances are appropriate. This is not the same thing as epilepsy which means having a tendency to recurrent spontaneous seizures. The information in this leaflet relates to people with epilepsy. What is a Seizure? A seizure (often called a fit and sometimes an attack, turn or blackout) happens when ordinary highly complex brain activity is suddenly disrupted. Seizures can take many forms, since the brain is...

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Identifying Seizures

Identifying Seizures

It is often hard to distinguish seizure types.  This information is for educational purposes only, and should not take the place of seizure typing by video EEG through a certified epileptologist. Absence Seizures (click for details) These seizures are most often diagnosed because of their tendency to appear as brief generalized epileptic seizures with sudden onset and termination. Characterized by the impairment of consciousness, thus absence. Video 1 Video 2 Video 3 Atonic Seizures (click for details) Atonic seizures are diagnosed by...

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Photosensitivity as a Seizure Trigger

Photosensitivity as a Seizure Trigger

Some non-moving patterns with high contrast may trigger seizures in some people with photosensitive epilepsy. Examples of high contrast patterns are black and white stripes, some patterned materials and wallpapers, and sunlight through slatted blinds. Polarized, blue lens  sunglasses may help with photosensitivity.  Ask your optician to find the deepest blue tint possible.  The Z1 lens , listed in a study below, is available only in Italy.  Polarized, blue lens are useful in preventing photosensitive seizures in many epilepsy...

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